Benefits of click and collect

Click and collect is all about customers making a purchase online and choosing to collect that purchase at a pre-chosen location, rather than have it delivered to their home.

Opting for a click and collect system allows you to offer customers different options for collection fulfillment. differentiation yourself from other

Doing this allows you to differentiate yourself from other eCommerce retailers.

Benefits for customers

Customers who use click and collect get to control when they want to pick up their delivery. They no longer have to consider or think about missing a delivery.

Also, they’re not met with any added delivery costs. It’s much more convenient for them this way.

If they want to order an item, and it’s not available in their local store, click and collect allows them to browse other stores to see if it’s available elsewhere.

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Benefits for retailers

Cost saving. Although you will have to pay a cost to set up the click and collect system, you don’t have to pay for specific delivery drivers to drive all over the country, as the total number of delivery locations will be reduced.

Click and collect works best for items such as fashion, gadgets and household gadgets such as TV’s.

However, bulkier items such as furniture and kitchenware are less likely to be ordered via click and collect. This may be down to the nature of the items. They’re more likely to opt for direct delivery to their home, rather than having to deal with the heavy items themselves. You don’t have to pay for specific delivery drivers to drive all over the country, as the total number of delivery locations will be less.

Collaboration. Even if your eCommerce store doesn’t have a physical store, you can still utilise click and collect. Many stores collaborate and allow customers to collect online orders at their store from their stores.

click and collectFor example, in the UK, if yo order from Argos, you can collect that order in either Homebase or Sainsbury’s.

click and collect

If you don’t have any companies to collaborate with, then why not allow your customers to collect from specific collection boxes.

Using click and collect gets customers back into your store, where you can try and sell them further items.

For example. a customer might have ordered a laptop online and want to collect it in-store. Once they’re there you have the opportunity to sell them further items like a laptop case, or screen protector.

How to get better at doing it

To get better at ‘click and collect’ you need to connect the online with the offline to create a seamless experience.

click and collectCustomers buy online and have their items delivered because of how hassle-free it is. If you’re going to utilise click and collect then you need to adopt this same mentality and make sure the click and collect process is as easy as delivery is.

  • If you’re going to offer click and collect, make sure customers don’t have to wait too long in line for the in-store staff
  • Let customers know their order’s status
  • Make sure there is a distinct area in store for the customers to collect their items.

Takeaways

For small and medium eCommerce businesses there is generally a low-barrier cost to entry, so there’s no reason why you shouldn’t be thinking about implementing click and collect in your eCommerce efforts.

Click and collect is something you should be thinking about because it can act as a driving force for in-store purchases.

Consumers already do their research online before heading into a store to buy the item. Click and collect acts as a way for retailers to mirror the cross-channel service consumers are trying to perform themselves.

In this instance, it’s less likely to be stressful for customers because whilst normally customers will browse online and then buy the item in-store, this way they can be sure the item is available for them, before they even get there.

In the next few years, ‘Click & Collect’ is predicted to increase by 62.7 % to reach over £4 billion by 2018.